Anatomy of a Map, Part Two: The Geography

Posted by Connie on April 14th, 2013 with tags: , , , ,

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I’m a mapmaker, right? So first things first: let’s think about how we arrange the pertinent geography. Cartographically, Anne had two aims: (1) to focus on 36 place names in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania; and (2) to show the continent of Africa, highlighting all the countries she and her husband have visited. If I give full tribute to her East African place names within the frame of a map of the African continent, I’m making an impossibly big map. Solution: zoom in, zoom out. The main map, with its concentration of place names, is East Africa: zoom in. I’ll relegate the continent to an inset map: zoom out. Anne has very kindly provided me with a map of East Africa–she’s annotated it with all the locations they’ve visited, keyed by number to a typed list. She wants me to get it right, so she’s put a lot of time and thought into the information she provides me. You see how it’s total collaboration, the client/mapmaker relationship. Here’s the inset map: the countries Anne and her husband have visited are deeper in hue than the others. By the way, do you remember that Anne asked me to ┬áinclude a porcupine quill on the canvas? Here it is, holding up the scale of miles.

2 Comments »

2 Comments:

  1. Jill Says:

    I love the zoom-in, zoom-out idea. Your renderings of the animals and birds are so beautiful. You are amazingly creative i.e., the idea of using the quill to hold the scale!!!

  2. connie Says:

    Jill–these are all things to consider when planning a map. Hope it’s helpful!

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